16 November 2019 ~ 39 Comentarios

Five questions to “Mike” Pompeo, U.S. Secretary of State, regarding Cuba and Latin America

By Carlos Alberto Montaner

1.- Traditionally, U.S. foreign policy in relation to Cuba was based on the strategy of “containment of communism.” In the Cuban case that translated into diplomatic isolation, economic embargo (limited) and dissemination of information about the excesses of the dictatorship and its social and economic failures.

 Critics claimed that it had not “worked” after more than half a century of being put into practice.

 In December 2014, President Obama surprised the world by replacing that strategy with engagement, despite his promise that the U.S. would not move from its position if the regime did not take steps toward political openness.

 

Far from accepting the change of position of the United States, the Cuban regime increased repression against dissidents, raised economic claims for the consequences of the embargo that were absolutely out of place, and continued on the path of political Stalinism.

Predictably, the engagement didn’t “work” either.

The questions that arise from these premises are: Does the State Department realize that 90 miles from U.S. shores there is a tenacious enemy that must be eliminated? How far is the current administration willing to go to achieve that goal? Have they tried to achieve a bipartisan consensus in that regard? It is not a partisan issue. It is about the security of the United States.

 

First I want to send my congratulations to the Cuban people on the 500th anniversary of the founding of Havana. Despite the past 60 years of suffering and economic damage inflicted by the Castro regime, Cuba remains a country of great history and immense potential. This occasion is an opportunity to turn the page and begin the next chapter of Cuba’s story – and one promising stability, prosperity, and freedom for the Cuban people.

Cuba is a foreign policy priority for the Trump administration. The President’s National Security Memorandum of June 2017, which laid out our policy to support the Cuban people, while holding the Cuban regime accountable for both its human rights abuses at home, and its destabilizing interference elsewhere in the region, was only the beginning. Since then, we have imposed further sanctions on the Cuban regime, including removing an authorization for group ‘people-to-people’ travel, stopping U.S. passenger and recreational vessels like cruise ships, yachts, and private aircraft from traveling to Cuba, and ending scheduled U.S. air carrier service to all Cuban airports except Havana. We took these actions because the Cuban people do not largely profit from such exchanges – the regime does. All of these actions are designed to keep U.S. dollars from lining the pockets of the Cuban military — the very same people repressing the Cuban people at home, supporting Maduro in Venezuela, and who are aligned with Putin in Russia.

2.- The policy of economic sanctions against the Havana regime has returned because of Cuba’s military support, mainly intelligence, to the regimes of Venezuela, Bolivia, and Nicaragua. Is the current Administration willing to impose a naval blockade to prevent the supply of Venezuelan oil to Cuba?

 

Cuba’s interference in Venezuela and other countries in the region is totally unacceptable. Particularly egregious is the involvement of Cuban military and intelligence services who prop up the despot Maduro, in exchange for shipments of Venezuelan oil. This oil belongs to the Venezuelan people, who are suffering greatly under the economic, political, and humanitarian crisis that Maduro’s corruption and mismanagement created. Maduro’s use of oil to pay for Cuba’s meddling and abuses is theft on a grand scale and is illegal under Venezuelan law. We continue to seek new ways to limit this illegal exchange. The United States is currently focused on the tools of diplomacy and sanctions to build pressure for a democratic transition in Venezuela. We have made over 200 Venezuela-related designations since 2017, under the Kingpin Act and various executive orders. These actions hinder the illegitimate Maduro regime from using the U.S. financial system for its corrupt and socially destructive economic practices and impose a cost on the regime for its illicit practices, human rights violations, and corruption.

3.- The “Cuban case” cannot be separated from the “Venezuelan case.” Havana totally rules Venezuela. Obviously, Washington’s “passive” participation is not enough, and Latin American nations lack an active tradition to eradicate an imperialist nation like Venezuela-Cuba. It is not about the United States landing troops in the country, but it is expected that it will be able to destroy the Venezuelan defenses from the air while other Latin American nations occupy the terrain militarily. Do you, Mr. Secretary, consider such a scenario?

 The Cuban regime has made it clear that it not only supports, but is responsible for, the Maduro regime’s abuses of power. The United States remains resolute in actively supporting a peaceful transition to democracy, freedom, and rule of law in Venezuela. President Trump has said that all options are on the table in Venezuela, including a military option, but at the State Department we are currently focused on deploying all of our diplomatic and economic options to support interim President Guaido and the National Assembly in a peaceful restoration of democracy, freedom, and rule of law. We’ve said very clearly all along that we’re going to do all that we can to restore democracy for the Venezuelan people, and we are working closely with partners around the world to make that a reality. Nevertheless, the United States is determined to keep every option on the table to restore that democracy.

4.- In the case of Bolivia, Cuban interference is also flagrant. The current Cuban ambassador is a colonel specialized in intelligence and repression called Rafael Zamora, nicknamed “Zamora the Rooster (El Gallo Zamora)”, who has recommended Evo Morales “to wait until the Americans get tired”, the same strategy they follow in Venezuela with Maduro and has worked in Cuba. Are Americans going to “get tired” or is there a policy of increasing sanctions until the will of Bolivians is respected in free elections?

 It is certainly true that the Cuban presence can be felt across the region. Ecuador recently expressed concerns that the Cubans were interfering in their sovereign territory, and we have seen how the Cuban regime has historically interfered in Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Venezuela. We are monitoring quickly unfolding events in Bolivia and the departure of Evo Morales and other members of the Bolivian government. We call on everyone to refrain from violence during this tense time and we will continue to work with our international partners to ensure that Bolivia’s democracy and constitutional order endure. The Bolivian people deserve free and fair elections that respect their constitution. We commend the professional work of the Organization of American States (OAS) technical mission which found numerous egregious irregularities with Bolivia’s October 20 elections, committed on behalf of Evo Morales. We fully support the OAS and Bolivian calls for new elections and a new Electoral Tribunal that can ensure free and fair elections that reflect the will of the Bolivian people.

5.- At the beginning of the crisis, Daniel Ortega seemed determined to advance the elections and leave if the results were adverse to him. After hundreds of murders, does Washington contemplate that possibility or thinks that everything is lost? If so, what will the current US administration do?

 The United States’ position regarding Nicaragua is clear: the Ortega regime must cease its repression and respond to Nicaraguans’ call for genuinely free and fair elections that are both transparent and timely. The regime’s repression has caused more than 70,000 Nicaraguans to flee into exile since April 2018. The Ortega regime’s unilateral decision to abandon the national dialogue process in July betrayed its true intentions. The United States is working through diplomacy and sanctions to bring a peaceful resolution to Nicaragua’s political and economic crisis. The OAS has appointed a Commission on Nicaragua, consisting of representatives from the United States, Argentina, Canada, Jamaica, and Paraguay, to carry out diplomatic efforts at the highest level to seek a peaceful and effective solution to the crisis. The United States sanctioned three Nicaraguan officials on November 7 for human rights abuses, electoral fraud, and corruption. We have sanctioned 14 individuals and one entity since the start of the crisis.

39 Responses to “Five questions to “Mike” Pompeo, U.S. Secretary of State, regarding Cuba and Latin America”

  1. Víctor López 16 November 2019 at 4:50 pm Permalink

    Muy extenso, Carlos Alberto y muy sin respuestas su cuestionario. De ilusiones también se vive, pero ningún país latinoamericano moverá un solo hombre para socorrer a Venezuela. La simbiosis cubano venezolana es tal que no se puede politiquear ni entenderse separadamente. En Bolivia la dupla fracasó porque el apoyo lo buscaron en el indigenismo y este no reúne las condiciones suficientes para apuntalar una doctrina (cualquiera que sea).

    La próxima administración Trump (si es que queda), tampoco moverá un dedo fuera de las poses políticas necesarias para medrar el voto hispano. Chile salvó al eje Habana Caracas y la noche socialista que se avecina será larga y hambrienta. Las próximas fichas por jugar son Chile, Brasil y Colombia, cuyos gobiernos, de puro miedo, pasan mirando para otro lado. Los países “cuento” del río de La Plata o México, están exentos de peligro, seguirán como es su costumbre diciendo una cosa y haciendo otra, al final que se jodan los que les crean.

    Cordialmente.

  2. Víctor López 16 November 2019 at 4:51 pm Permalink

    Cambia el texto al subirlo, por la diferencia idiomática.

    • joseluis 18 November 2019 at 8:25 pm Permalink

      La razón, y el raciocinio : ¿Quien me dice algo?

  3. Humberto 16 November 2019 at 9:48 pm Permalink

    CUBANS:
    PLEASE LISTEN, MATURE POLITICALLY; Let’s see if finally after 67 years we stop being the owner of everyone and the free world takes us seriously.
    If the apie Cubans and those already in opposition are unaware of this, what can be expected from the governments of the free countries.
    And if there is someone within those governments or international free institutions that knows and sees us doing the same since 1952, it will be said:
    You really have to keep waiting for them to mature; because they are not yet ready to govern themselves or otherwise impose another Platt Amendment that controls the caudillista uprisings every two years as until 1933.
    https://www.facebook.com/humberto.mondejar/videos/2519327871456121/
    Colonel Vicente Méndez Movement, perhaps the group with the most royal members within Cuba; He is also a defender of the C-40.

  4. Manuel 17 November 2019 at 2:38 am Permalink

    “Hey, Millennials! That fresh-faced high school or college graduate doing your job in the next cubicle may be earning almost as much as you. Possibly more.
    Workers age 20 to 24, who are overwhelmingly new entrants to the labor market, are getting pay increases averaging 6%, double the annual wage gains of all U.S. workers, according to a study by the Conference Board provided exclusively to USA TODAY. The figures are based on a four-quarter moving average of Labor Department data through the second quarter of 2019.
    Recent grads are benefiting from the tightest labor market in decades, with the 3.6% unemployment rate hovering just above a 50-year low and making it tough for employers to find qualified workers.
    Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning
    “When you hire new people, you have to obey market conditions,” says Gad Levanon, chief economist of the Conference Board. “If you don’t… you won’t be able to hire them.”
    By contrast, he adds, “People who are staying at their current companies are just getting regular annual increases.”
    In other words, by doling out modest raises, businesses are relying on existing workers’ ignorance of market conditions or reluctance to endure the hassles of a job search, Levanon says. Like recent graduates, older workers who ask for bigger raises or switch to higher-paying jobs are also making the most of the scramble for workers, Levanon says. Job switchers, however, make up a relatively small share of all workers, whose average wages have been rising about 3% a year.
    JOB HOPPING
    There are other reasons younger workers often see faster pay increases than older ones. They do more job-hopping and are starting from a lower base, says Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist of Glassdoor.
    The Conference Board data, however, underscore a narrowing pay gap between workers age 20 to 24, largely members of Gen Z, who are typically landing their first jobs, and more experienced 25- to 34-year-olds, who fall in the millennial generation. Since 2014, the younger group’s wage gains have increasingly outpaced their older counterparts, figures show, a trend that can be traced to the tightening job market.
    As a result, the recent grads now earn 71.4% of their elders’ pay on average, up from 65.6% in 2013 and the highest share in nearly four decades. In some cases, Levanon says, recent grads may earn as much or more than experienced millennials. 
    How big a nest egg?: Pete the Planner: Could a retiree outlive his savings even with a part-time job? Possibly.
    That narrowing gap, known as pay compression, “is a huge problem” for employers, Levanon says.
    “Studies show pay compression leads to low morale and high turnover” as many older workers bolt for other jobs, he says.
    PAY COMPARISON SITES
    That’s partly because online job sites such as Glassdoor and others allow workers to check out the average pay of other employees doing their job, and even break down the figures based on years of experience.
    Seventy-three percent of workers say they’ve checked their salary against market rates within the last year; and more than half have compared their salaries with coworkers, according to a survey by staffing firm Robert Half over the summer.
    In July, 3.7 million workers quit jobs, typically to take other ones, the highest on Labor records dating to 2000. The total has since dipped but remains near a 19-year high.
    “New employees at a company are often being paid more than tenured employees,” said Brian Kropp, head of Gartner’s human resources practice.
    The Conference Board study also shows that company budgets for annual salary increases have risen only slightly, from about 2.8% in 2011 to 3.2% this year. By contrast, average U.S. wage growth has climbed from 2% to 3% during that period.
    Unlike wage growth, the budgets don’t account for new hires, promotions or state minimum wage increases and underscore that companies haven’t substantially boosted pay for existing staffers despite the worker shortages, Levanon says”

  5. joseluis 17 November 2019 at 3:40 am Permalink

    Tanta estrategia vana con dos o tres patadas hubieran sacado aquel que no , ni molesta. Es la ridiculez de hacer crecer a una pulga

  6. Manuel 17 November 2019 at 5:49 pm Permalink

    No premortem thinking may be fatal:

    “ The most effective check against them, as Kahneman says, is from the outside: Others can perceive our errors more readily than we can. And “slow-thinking organizations,” as he puts it, can institute policies that include the monitoring of individual decisions and predictions. They can also require procedures such as checklists and “premortems,” an idea and term thought up by Gary Klein, a cognitive psychologist. A premortem attempts to counter optimism bias by requiring team members to imagine that a project has gone very, very badly and write a sentence or two describing how that happened. Conducting this exercise, it turns out, helps people think ahead”

    • Manuel 17 November 2019 at 5:51 pm Permalink

      .
      Se nos olvida siempre, que de tanto
      Querernos, llegamos siempre
      A ser nuestro único
      Enemigo
      .

      • joseluis 18 November 2019 at 8:58 pm Permalink

        Y que hacemos para no tener el único enemigo, llevar la vista a la ceguedad.

      • joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:08 pm Permalink

        Cuando se piensa a la ligera, se dicen cosas que no tienen respuestas, son palabras que se pierden en la incomprensión.

      • joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:14 pm Permalink

        No te precipite amigo, y no te apure de lo que no puedes decir .

  7. Manuel 18 November 2019 at 5:33 am Permalink

    subjects’ disinclination to believe statistical and other general evidence, basing their judgments instead on individual examples and vivid anecdotes. (This bias is known as base-rate neglect.)

  8. Manuel 18 November 2019 at 8:07 am Permalink

    For example, the day after McHenry and the other delegates signed the Constitution and officially adjourned—he recorded the following exchange:

    “a lady asked Dr. Franklin

    well Doctor what we got

    a republic or a monarchy—

    A republic replied the Doctor

    if you can keep it”
    .

    Bolivia just was able to keep it!

    Kudos!

  9. manuel 18 November 2019 at 1:16 pm Permalink

    hemos visto una cuba violenta este ano, pero ha sido poco comparado con la cuba que nos espera: estara en alerta maxima y maxima represion; la perdida de Brasil, Colombia, Bolivia y el asedio a venezuela y nicaragua sacaran a flote la cara mas dinamica y atroz de esos regimenes. Caliente el ano 2020, sobre todo si gana trump. Trump hara todo lo posible, y si tiene que sacudirse a todos esos dictadores lo hara, “todo lo que haga falta por la presidencia”

    • Manuel 18 November 2019 at 8:27 pm Permalink

      …a propósito, hoy sale esto:

      “ El ministro del Interior de Bolivia, Arturo Murillo, indicó que un grupo conformado por cubanos, venezolanos y colombianos, estaría preparando un atentado contra la presidenta interina del país, Jeanine Añez.

      Por tal razón, la mandataria tuvo que suspender su viaje fuera de La Paz, ya que consideraban que era una “amenaza creíble” sacarla de la capital.”

  10. Víctor López 18 November 2019 at 3:08 pm Permalink

    Qué va. La hidra de Lerna está también en esta América española y la estupidez de sus hijos la alimenta.

  11. manuel 18 November 2019 at 3:29 pm Permalink

    How stupid is people?

    See this:

    “ Whose untimely death would you most like to reverse?
    ILLUSTRATIONS BY GRAHAM ROUMIEU

    Alison Sweeney, actor and producer
    Abraham Lincoln’s assassination changed the trajectory of the United States. We’ll never know what could have been if he’d been able to finish his second term.
    Victor Levin, writer and director, Destination Wedding and 5 to 7
    Anton Yelchin died tragically at 27, having made some 40 feature films. There was no finer actor. He was also a gifted writer and director, with a dazzling intellect and revolutionary ideas. Had he lived, I believe he would have been the Orson Welles of his generation.
    Ashley Eckstein, founder, Her Universe, and actor, Star Wars: The Clone Wars
    I often ask myself what Walt Disney would think of his company if he were alive today—is it what he hoped it would be? Disney changed the world. Imagine how much more happiness and magic he could have spread had he not passed away early.
    READER RESPONSES
    Robert A. Legg, Greensboro, Ga.
    Listening to a sample of Buddy Holly’s best work—“That’ll Be the Day,” “Oh, Boy!,” “Maybe Baby,” “Rave On,” “Peggy Sue”—one can’t help but wonder how many other classics he might have written and recorded had he lived past the age of 22.
    f0100-02
    Betsy Golden Kellem, New Haven, Conn.
    Jim Henson. No one was better at navigating life’s dualities: youth and age, innocence and darkness, slapstick and depth, men and Muppets. “Bein’ Green” still makes me cry.
    Eric Weinberger, Cambridge, Mass.
    Yitzhak Rabin. Some people now say that the Oslo Accords were never going to work. But that’s not how it seemed in 1995, when Israel was led by perhaps the one person who could, by force of will and brave politics, bring a decent peace to Israel and its neighbors.
    Thomas Cahill, Bar Harbor, Maine
    A twofer: Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. What America could have looked like today had they not died in 1968.
    Erik Hogstrom, Dubuque, Iowa
    The Delta bluesman Robert Johnson, who died at age 27. How would music history have unfolded had Johnson lived long enough for recording technology to catch up with his prodigious talents? I suspect that the development of 20th-century musical styles would have been greatly accelerated.
    Ernest F. Imhoff, Baltimore, Md.
    James Garfield was assassinated by a crazed job seeker just months after he became the 20th president. Some contemporaries and historians have said that with his intelligence, high moral purpose, and record as a Union general in the Civil War, Garfield might have become one of America’s greatest presidents.
    f0100-03
    Leslie Ellen Brown, Spring Mills, Pa.
    The trifecta of brilliant composers who died before we could call them middle-aged: Mozart (35), Schubert (31), and Mendelssohn (38). What great music churned in their brains but wasn’t put down on paper?”

  12. manuel 18 November 2019 at 4:07 pm Permalink

    How stupid is people?

    See this:

    “ Whose untimely death would you most like to reverse?

    Alison Sweeney, actor and producer

    Abraham Lincoln’s assassination changed the trajectory of the United States. We’ll never know what could have been if he’d been able to finish his second term.

    Victor Levin, writer and director, Destination Wedding and 5 to 7
    Anton Yelchin died tragically at 27, having made some 40 feature films. There was no finer actor. He was also a gifted writer and director, with a dazzling intellect
    and revolutionary ideas. Had he lived, I believe he would have been the Orson Welles of his generation.

    Ashley Eckstein, founder, Her Universe, and actor, Star Wars: The Clone Wars
    I often ask myself what Walt Disney would think of his company if he were alive today—is it what he hoped it would be? Disney changed the world. Imagine how much more happiness and magic he could have spread had he not passed away early.

    Robert A. Legg, Greensboro, Ga.:
    Listening to a sample of Buddy Holly’s best work—“That’ll Be the Day,” “Oh, Boy!,” “Maybe Baby,” “Rave On,” “Peggy Sue”—one can’t help but wonder how many other classics he might have written and recorded had he lived past the age of 22.

    Betsy Golden Kellem, New Haven, Conn.:
    Jim Henson. No one was better at navigating life’s dualities: youth and age, innocence and darkness, slapstick and depth, men and Muppets. “Bein’ Green” still makes me cry.

    Eric Weinberger, Cambridge, Mass.:
    Yitzhak Rabin. Some people now say that the Oslo Accords were never going to work. But that’s not how it seemed in 1995, when Israel was led by perhaps the one person who could, by force of will and brave politics, bring a decent peace to Israel and its neighbors.

    Thomas Cahill, Bar Harbor, Maine:
    A twofer: Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. What America could have looked like today had they not died in 1968.

    Erik Hogstrom, Dubuque, Iowa:
    The Delta bluesman Robert Johnson, who died at age 27. How would music history have unfolded had Johnson lived long enough for recording technology to catch up with his prodigious talents? I suspect that the development of 20th-century musical styles would have been greatly accelerated.

    Ernest F. Imhoff, Baltimore, Md.:
    James Garfield was assassinated by a crazed job seeker just months after he became the 20th president. Some contemporaries and historians have said that with his intelligence, high moral purpose, and record as a Union general in the Civil War, Garfield might have become one of America’s greatest presidents.

    Leslie Ellen Brown, Spring Mills, Pa.:
    The trifecta of brilliant composers who died before we could call them middle-aged: Mozart (35), Schubert (31), and Mendelssohn (38). What great music churned in their brains but wasn’t put down on paper?”

    • Víctor López 18 November 2019 at 7:39 pm Permalink

      Por supuesto no alteraría ninguno, de poder hacerlo desaparecería este conglomerado humano, que sería reemplazado por otro. Ni siquiera alteraría en algo al más reciente, porque pasaría Julián a tener tres nietos o ninguno. Saludos.

      • joseluis 18 November 2019 at 8:44 pm Permalink

        La razón, y el raciocinio : ¿Quien me dice algo?
        Quien puede decirme la verdad, si nadie la tiene.
        El enredo cerebral de aquellos que se creen que piensan.

  13. Manuel 18 November 2019 at 6:54 pm Permalink

    Evo

    “ In 2016 he narrowly lost a referendum to abolish presidential term limits. He got the constitutional court to say he could run for a third term anyway. He then claimed victory in a dubious election last month. That triggered the uprising. An outside audit upheld the opposition’s claims of widespread irregularities. His offer to re-run the election came too late.
    Mr Morales was thus the casualty of a counter-revolution aimed at defending democracy and the constitution against electoral fraud and his own illegal candidacy. The army withdrew its support because it was not prepared to fire on people in order to sustain him in power. How these events will come to be viewed depends in part on what happens now (see Americas section). An opposition leader has taken over as interim president and called for a fresh election to be held in a matter of weeks. There are two big risks in this. One is that ultras in the opposition try to erase the good things Mr Morales stood for as well as the bad. The other is that his supporters seek to destabilise the interim government and boycott the election. It may take outside help to ensure a fair contest.
    That the army had to play a role is indeed troubling. But the issue at stake in Bolivia was what should happen, in extremis, when an elected president deploys the power of the state against the constitution. In Mr Morales’s resignation and the army’s forcing of it, Bolivia has set an example for Venezuela and Nicaragua, though it is one that is unlikely to be heeded. In the past it was right-wing strongmen who refused to leave power when legally obliged to do so. Now it is often those on the left. Their constant invocation of coups tends to be a smokescreen for their own flouting of the rules. It should be examined with care. ■

  14. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 8:44 pm Permalink

    La razón, y el raciocinio : ¿Quien me dice algo?
    Quien puede decirme la verdad, si nadie la tiene.
    El enredo cerebral de aquellos que se creen que piensan.

  15. Víctor López 18 November 2019 at 9:03 pm Permalink

    Bueno, José Luis, eso le pasa usted, y nosotros no tenemos la culpa. Con mi rústico raciocinio he tenido que regirme siempre por probabilidades. La percepción y el análisis, que me dan una referencia solo aproximada. La suma de todas esas elecciones por aproximación, me han entregado un resultado favorable. Esto en lo que a mis deseos he intereses respecta, y en referencia a otros congéneres por mi conocidos. Un saludo.

    • joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:31 pm Permalink

      Y nosotros no tenemos la culpa. La pandilla revolucionaria: “Nosotros”

  16. Víctor López 18 November 2019 at 9:05 pm Permalink

    La columna traduce para la mierda.

  17. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:18 pm Permalink

    Y la mierda no dice nada.

  18. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:20 pm Permalink

    Solo se dicen aquellos que acarician en ella

  19. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:22 pm Permalink

    Solo se dicen aquellos que se acarician en ella

  20. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:32 pm Permalink

    Y nosotros no tenemos la culpa. La pandilla revolucionaria: “Nosotros”

  21. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 9:47 pm Permalink

    Cuando hablas mucho, y no dices nada, te conviertes en una muda cotorra.

  22. joseluis 18 November 2019 at 10:18 pm Permalink

    Esto foro es en español, no sé porque se escribe en ingles, se puede aladear también en francés y, en chino y en portugués.

  23. danettee 19 November 2019 at 10:09 am Permalink

    bueno dia manuel

  24. Manuel 19 November 2019 at 8:40 pm Permalink

    ‘ Writing to George Washington, Hamilton warned:
    When a man unprincipled in private life desperate in his fortune, bold in his temper, possessed of considerable talents … is seen to mount the hobby horse of popularity—to join in the cry of danger to liberty—to take every opportunity of embarrassing the General Government & bringing it under suspicion—to flatter and fall in with all the non sense of the zealots of the day—It may justly be suspected that his object is to throw things into confusion that he may “ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.”

  25. manuel 20 November 2019 at 4:10 pm Permalink

    physicians must ensure that their patients benefit from scientific advances and expertise of all required specialists, but they usually do not. You must practice medicine well or you just chose the wrong career, you are condemned to forge you are happy but you certainly are not, you are in the wrong place, try anything else, but please, abandon this path that only suit persons with a very high vocation for service and sacrifice.

  26. vicente 22 November 2019 at 11:03 am Permalink

    que chevere es ser anticomunista si vives en Coconut Drive y en Key Bicayne,mamando del trabajo excedente,de la plusvalia,de trabajo muerto.

    • Manuel 22 November 2019 at 1:22 pm Permalink

      Que chevere ser Comunista viviendo
      De esquilmar a pobres y ricos
      Viviendo como maharajah mientras
      El país se hunde en el lógico
      Resultante estiércol


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